Friday, March 3, 2017

Stephen K. Bannon's Disappointing Book List


After searching the web I can find no evidence of a connection to Moldbug. A rumor invented by Vox is now an article in the Independent. What else do you expect from normie journalism? I did manage to put together a collection of book titles for which at least some evidence exists. All I can say is that if this is what Bannon is reading, to me the man is a bli******* ***** and a cu***********, in my opinion. The only thing remotely interesting to reactionaries will be Camp of the Saints. But even here we are dealing with emotional narratives. Nothing on this list proves to me that Bannon is what I would call "cerebral." References to "Judeo Christian values," induce retching. To me, he looks like a man driven by passion, and not a mastermind. Though he may be that too — in his own way.

The fact that Bannon has read 10 or more political non-fiction books puts him ahead 90% of the population. Which is a sad thing to say. The Fourth Turning is basically astrology. Black Earth is white people feeling guilty about shit Germans did. The Art of War is business school junior varsity crap. Antifragile is pompous and unnecessarily long. Everyone reads Shakespeare in high school. And the Gita? Who hasn't read that?

Barf.


Many of these sources are redundant.

American Jihad: The Terrorists Living Among Us, by Steven Emerson
Source

Antifragile, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
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The Art of War, by  Sun Tzu
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The Best and the Brightest, by David Halberstam
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The Bhagavad Gita
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Black Earth, by Timothy Snyder
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Camp of the Saints, by Jean Raspail
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The Fourth Turning, by William Strauss and Neil Howe
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The Private Life of Chairman Mao, by Li Zhisui
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Titus Andronicus, by William Shakespeare
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